Thoughts of a Dog Trainer

"Shut up and Click"

427 notes

workingwithjayne:

Guys, listen up!  I recently saw a post about dog body language that was complete and utter crap.  There is no such thing as a “dominant” or “submissive” dog.  When a dog walks with its head and tail up, it’s not trying to be “dominant”, it’s exhibiting confidence in both itself and its handler.  You want a confident dog.  A dog walking with its head and tail down is not being “submissive” towards you, it’s showing calming signals  (tail down, ears back, wide and squinted eyes, licking lips).  This means the dog is insecure with you, itself, or in Jayne’s case, the environment (in this case a man working on the roof).  

I can’t stress this enough: The top figure should be encouraged, not the bottom one.  So please, Cesar Millan junkies and dominance-based trainers, think twice before you encourage your dog to be insecure.

(via fuckthecesarway)

0 notes

Anonymous asked: Hi there! I just recently got two German Shep puppies, and they're both from the same litter. I know about littermate syndrome, and we're being careful not to let that happen! But we're currently working on potty training, and they're doing good. If they go outside, they potty. It's just that we keep missing when they need to go-- we take them out after morning, food, water, late at night, etc. But how do we enforce when we miss their mistakes/cues? Thanks!

Hi! Once they have had an accident on the floor, there’s nothing you can do as far as letting them know it was “wrong”. They will not make an association after the fact.

They key to potty training is very careful management (supervision). Keep them confined to a small area within your sight; don’t let them have access to the full house. For example, if you are sitting at a desk, use a puppy playpen to make an enclosure around you and keep them near. Use gates to block off doorways, or you can tether them to you with leashes.

Set up a schedule and take them out regularly. Start with, say, every two hours. Set an alarm. If they have no accidents with this routine for a full day, increase the time by 30 minutes the next day.

13 notes

I want to introduce you all to Snowflake. Snowflake is a very special horse- my soul horse. My wish came true when my parents said I could have a horse for Christmas one year. I choose her because of The Black Stallion- my favorite horse movie. She is Arabian, and as soon as I heard that, I knew I had to have her. I learned to ride on her, bareback and bitless.
I did not know, and neither did my veterinarian, that her periodically runny eyes were a symptom of a disease called Equine Recurrent Uveitis, and not allergies as he thought. I had no idea that my beautiful Snowflake would soon be living in a world of darkness. Seemingly overnight, she went completely blind in both eyes.
She did not take loosing her sight well at all. She already had the jumpy, flighty Arab temperament, and it took her a long time to adjust. I can only imagine how scary it is for a prey animal to loose their sight.
An accident occurred not long after she lost her sight in which she ran through two fences and into the neighbor’s truck. This did not sit well with the neighbor, and a new living situation had to be found for her. She went to live with a horse ‘rescue’ several hours away.
Skip to today, almost four years later. She’s now back with me. The rescue tired of her and so I rescued her back before they euthanized my Snowflake. She’s now staying on a wonderful ranch with some amazing friends, and I visit her several times a week. We are beginning a clicker training journey together in hopes of building a trusting relationship like never before.
I’m sure you will hear more about my Snowflake and our journey in the weeks and months to come.
"Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content." -Helen Keller

I want to introduce you all to Snowflake. Snowflake is a very special horse- my soul horse. My wish came true when my parents said I could have a horse for Christmas one year. I choose her because of The Black Stallion- my favorite horse movie. She is Arabian, and as soon as I heard that, I knew I had to have her. I learned to ride on her, bareback and bitless.

I did not know, and neither did my veterinarian, that her periodically runny eyes were a symptom of a disease called Equine Recurrent Uveitis, and not allergies as he thought. I had no idea that my beautiful Snowflake would soon be living in a world of darkness. Seemingly overnight, she went completely blind in both eyes.

She did not take loosing her sight well at all. She already had the jumpy, flighty Arab temperament, and it took her a long time to adjust. I can only imagine how scary it is for a prey animal to loose their sight.

An accident occurred not long after she lost her sight in which she ran through two fences and into the neighbor’s truck. This did not sit well with the neighbor, and a new living situation had to be found for her. She went to live with a horse ‘rescue’ several hours away.

Skip to today, almost four years later. She’s now back with me. The rescue tired of her and so I rescued her back before they euthanized my Snowflake. She’s now staying on a wonderful ranch with some amazing friends, and I visit her several times a week. We are beginning a clicker training journey together in hopes of building a trusting relationship like never before.

I’m sure you will hear more about my Snowflake and our journey in the weeks and months to come.

"Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content." -Helen Keller

Filed under clicker training horses horse blind horse

26 notes

disabledbeauties:

This is Disabled Beauty Tyla.

Tyla is 21 and lives in Oregon. She has Ehler Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). Tyla became disabled when she was 16. Tyla’s previous service dog, the handsome Barkley, was retired as a service dog when it became too stressful for him. 

Tyla was recently offered this Service Dog in Training named Samson. Samson was trained with positive reinforcement training, no forceful training. He even has a top of the line mobility harness (I have one for my own service dog, they cost about $400). Samson’s future handler has become too ill and Samson is being donated to Tyla! But Tyla needs to fly from Oregon to Texas to get Samson.  Tyla has the money to take care of Samson and finish his training but she doesn’t have $600 tucked away in her back pocket to go get Samson. 

We are trying to help Tyla in any way we can get to to Texas to get Samson to help her live a better and more fulfilling life. Even if you can’t donate to help Tyla then please, reblog, share the link, donate frequent flier miles.  Beautiful Disabled isn’t just here to show pictures of lovely disabled people, but to empower disabled people to do awesome things with their lives. You could be part of that!!

Bring Tyla and Samson together!

A
lso, Disabled Beauty AyreBlossum is having a fundraiser for Tyla in her  Etsy shop. 25% of profits for the next few weeks will go to helping Tyla bring Samson home!

AyreBlossum on Etsy!

I am Samson’s trainer. His original handler has become too ill to continue his training, and that’s when we discovered Tyla, who is in need of a dog just like him! The only problem is, Samson is in Texas and Tyla is in Oregon. Please help get Samson to Tyla by sharing or donating if you can!

Filed under dog dogs dog training service dog assistance dog clicker training pets

0 notes

Doing a bit of verbal cue practice with my dog Pebbles. I did not realize until filming myself how much I am actually using my body language to cue her! Filming your training sessions can be very helpful to fix mistakes as well as chart your progress.